Spellerberg Projects

Ongoing and Upcoming

Texas State University Art Show

Opens Fri Dec 6, 7pm

Spellerberg Projects, Masur Gallery
119 W San Antonio St, Lockhart TX
Opens Fri Dec 6, 7pm


Exhibition featuring students from Texas State University’s School of Art and Design. The show consists of students from beginning painting and drawing highlighting their assignments and approaches throughout the Fall semester of 2019.

Curated by Hollie Brown and Michael Villarreal

Artists featured:
Komal Bhakta
Alondra Carbajal
Hayden Castor
Peyton Clark
Hannah Comstock
Viviane Coronado Jalomo
Sabrina Cowles
Mila Doiron
Sydney Easley
Alexis Frierson
Moises Garza
Chloe Gonzalez
Elizabeth Hobbs
Alex Holmes
Sebastian Hubele
Ashley Lambright
Mikayla Magee
Mikayla McDonough
Amanda Meneses
Brett Malik
Raymundo Marquez
Christoff Miller
Kerstyn Rankin
Samantha Romero
Tyler Vinklarek
Taryn Wharton
Conner Yarbrough

Cristina Velásquez, New World

On now

Spellerberg Projects
103 S Main St, Lockhart TX
Open by appointment (Email)


“The New World,” as a designation for the Americas, originated in sixteenth-century Europe during the so-called age of discovery. Four centuries later, the term still evokes a combination of idealistic optimism and strategic exploitation. Cristina Velasquez questions this legacy from the perspective of her native Colombia. Deploying the concept of mestizaje, or the mixing of different ethnicities and cultures, Velasquez combines photography (a new medium) with weaving (an ancient method). Neither is privileged: weaving lends texture and dimension to photography, and photography adds representational detail to weaving. Velasquez produces objects that are overtly manual in origin, asking the viewer to think about labor—her own, and also that of Latin American people across the history of colonialism—as her true subject. Rather than illustrating working bodies in a conventionally documentary way, Velasquez frequently depicts isolated limbs in stylized, almost sculptural arrangements. These photographs are collaborative stagings of bodies in landscapes. In another form of mestizaje, they blend categories of genre and tone. Serious in intent and exacting in terms of craftsmanship, Velasquez’s “New World” is also animated by a sense of absurdity and joyous color. The artist’s approach is not didactic or propagandistic, but delivers its social and historic message via performance, engaging the viewer in the game of questioning, revision, and revelation.

–Britt Salvesen, Curator and Head of the Wallis Annenberg Photography Department and the Prints and Drawings Department at LACMA.

About the artist

Cristina Velásquez (Colombia) is a visual artist working mainly with photography and paper weavings. Her work investigates representation and translation in the context of transcultural relationships —both as mechanisms for oppression and silencing, as well as powerful tools for connection and resistance. She is interested in the way one culture translates another, and how inevitably, a dominant culture sanitizes and reduces the other in a subtle, and not so subtle, continuity of colonialism. Similarly, Velásquez explores the ways social constructions of value, such as, race, class, and labor distribution, are shaped by images and language, echoing a larger system of power and exchange that goes beyond borders and nationality. Velásquez asks how photography and weaving might be called upon to further the understanding of social politics, history, and narrative, particularly in relation to Latin American studies.

Artist’s website

Hollie Brown, The Triumph of Death

On now

Spellerberg Projects, Masur Gallery
119 W San Antonio St, Lockhart TX
Open by appointment (Email)


The first known painting dubbed The Triumph of Death exists as a fresco in the Regional Gallery of Palazzo Abatellis in Palermo, dated around 1446, creator unknown. In 1562, Pieter Bruegel the Elder, inspired by the earlier fresco, painted a 16th century update for his version, also titled, The Triumph of Death.

The third iteration, again titled, The Triumph of Death, is currently underway in the form of a site specific painting and sculpture, by artist Hollie Anne Brown. Cut outs of both 15th and 16th century versions are crudely pasted onto a color field which was previously rendered in a slapstick manner on her laptop.

In 1446 and 1562 a hypothetical answer was proposed to the question, “What happens when we die?” Bruegel and the unknown artist painted an image of death (personified by skeletons) triumphing over humans, with comic undertones. Curiously, neither painting were biblically derived.

Brown’s 2018 version does not propose an answer to this question, rather it honors the beauty of questions remaining questions. Images alluding to the sun and black holes, representing questions of life and alternate dimensions, take a center spot in her two seemingly identical murals, each over 25 feet long and 8 feet high.

On the evening of November 2nd, 2018, the finished version will go on display. Sometime later the murals will be buried in the wall under a few coats of white paint.

About the artist:

Hollie Brown lives in Lockhart, Texas. She received her M.F.A. from the University of California, Riverside, and currently teaches at Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas.

Artist’s website

Miranda Terry, Reconstructing Memories

On now

Spellerberg Projects, Masur Gallery
119 W San Antonio St, Lockhart TX
Open by appointment (Email)


Miranda Terry creates paintings, objects, and installations that reflect upon the intangible qualities of remembrance, ingenuity, and function. She works with found objects that range from broken concrete to trash off the street.

“I pick up an object whose intended purpose has failed, and I say ‘No.’ Building these objects, I manipulate surfaces and materials in a tangible way while considering the intangible qualities of memory, resourcefulness, and function. I am interested in how the material lineage of seemingly inconsequential objects can converge into larger wholes that both reference and redefine our collective experience. My paintings and objects explore the tension between interdependence and autonomy.”

Miranda lives and works in San Marcos TX, where she recently received her BFA in Studio Art from Texas State University. She is currently intern at ICOSA Art collective in Austin and manages the painting studio at Texas State.

Artist’s Instagram

Jennifer Moore, Sculpture and Video

On now

Spellerberg Projects, Masur Gallery
119 W San Antonio St, Lockhart TX
Opened Sat May 25


Jennifer Moore creates videos, sculptures and drawings that hover around themes of home and body. Her preferred materials are broken household items, fabric, bottles and old electronics. She finds these items lying around the city of San Marcos where she lives and works. She received a BFA in Studio Art from the Texas State University School of Art & Design in 2018. Describing her recent work, she says:

“Homes, bodies, buildings, beds and coffins are all containers we may find ourselves within. Focusing on the point where you and your container meet is grounding and soothing to the nervous system. People find their edges by seeking shelter in small spaces, crawling under blankets, allowing their bodies to be shaken by loud music, or focusing on their heartbeat. There are infinite ways to draw a line around oneself, to contain oneself and then connect it to the rest of the world. I play with this line by making my own variations of these physical and psychological borders. Projected video passes through translucent strips of fabric to create an ambiguous wall and broken image. Faux medical equipment and bottles encased in rubber have no apparent use though they obviously relate to the body. Individuals are chroma-keyed into strange still lives while describing their homes. Performers mirror each other’s tiny movements and run towards the camera’s frame. A jogging choir circles a track in a live action turntable. How many ways can we draw ourselves?”

Jennifer Moore on Instagram

Raj Sukamoto, Only Smoky People

On now

Spellerberg Projects, Masur Gallery
119 W San Antonio St, Lockhart TX
Open by appointment (Email)


“Please take the time to welcome the wonderful Raj Sukamoto (1969, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa) for his first stay in Texas, organized by Texas native Travis Broussard (Co-founder and Co-director of the Ceci Foundation) who is also providing furniture to frame a completely new body of Sukamoto’s ceramic vases doubling as smoking pipes.

“Sukamoto scarcely shows, the last known exhibition being two years back at the now closed New Day Gallery in Berlin. He has since then taken up residency in Texas, creating new ceramics heavily inspired in what he calls “only smoky people”. Who the “only Smoky People” are we can only speculate about, but it is clear that the ceramics have taken on almost human forms. Possibly unaware of their relation to Brancusi and modernist sculpture they can also be said to have a resemblance to something humorously extra-terrestrial. Unfortunately, but not surprisingly Sukamoto will not attend his own opening preferring to stay out of his own way.”

Thompson & Wallace, Drag Nest

On now

Spellerberg Projects, Masur Gallery
119 W San Antonio St, Lockhart TX
Open by appointment (Email)


Drag Nest, an installation by Samantha Thompson and Andrea Wallace, presents the audience with an introduction to the diverse landscape of contemporary drag in an intimate setting.

The artists transform a space in the Masur Gallery into a Drag Queen’s bedroom, with a 1970s aesthetics and traces of the previous era. On the walls is art that this imaginary queen has collected, created by the artists, including portraits of performers whom one can imagine as part of the Queen’s drag family.

The room feels like an intimate space one has stepped into, unsure if they should be there. The visitor observes the personal artifacts of a stranger who could walk in any moment and catch them in the act, but the allure of the environment will make them want to linger. The furniture, textiles, light fixtures, books and tchotchkes all reflect a garish yet attractive lifestyle full of beauty, passion, vice, lust and art and otherness.

The opening reception, which took place June 22 2019, was accompanied by a performance by Hentaii.